The problem

Lock bumping is a method of entry using an adapted key that is placed in a cylinder lock, pulled back 1 notch or click, then struck firmly with a reasonably heavy object.

How to fix it

Safeguard your locks with this home security solution from Pickbuster - a high tack lubricant applied to the moving parts of a pin cylinder lock to discourage unauthorised entry.

Order Pickbuster direct from UAP online now. Delivery is usually within 48 hours to any UK mainland address.

What is Lock Bumping?

Protect your home from lock bumping, a lock-picking technique that uses a special bump key to force any number of locks. You can safeguard your locks with this home security solution from Pickbuster - a high tack lubricant which is applied to the moving parts of a pin cylinder lock to negate the technique and discourage unauthorised entry. Once applied, it needs to be left for around four to five hours so it can be absorbed by the mechanism.

Lock bumping is a method of entry using an adapted key that is placed in a cylinder lock, pulled back 1 notch or click, then struck firmly with a reasonably heavy object.

Lock bumping has been around for about 70 years within the locksmithing world. It first came over from the US and then spread into Europe. There are some lock enthusiast clubs where bumping is a sport and members spend their evenings timing each other at lock bumping, but that is not where it stops. If you go onto the internet and type in ‘lock bumping’, all information is available and the opportunist thief is fully equipped after a little training. Whilst doing a survey, I discovered that throughout the world there were over 2,000,000 sites at that time on lock bumping.

It is possible to purchase bump keys from many sites as well as learning how to make the keys. Most countries have a pin tumbler lock of some shape and these are all bumpable, for example, garage locks, bullet locks (shutters), front doors, backdoors, some padlocks, rim latches (night latches), conservatories, and even some sheds.

It is very hard to determine if your house has been broken into via this method because of the lack of forensics. No damage, no prints and your goods are still gone. Then of course you get the problems with the insurance companies refusing to pay out because there is no forensic evidence. The Police Service have only recently been able to state that maybe the break-in could have been due to bumping and the door not left open, again the forensics problem. We know that the Police Services in the US, Australia, Canada & Europe acknowledge this method of entry and there have been a number of TV programmes making the public aware of this potential threat, however not in the UK.